A SHORT STORY BY DACKER THICKE

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AND NOW

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Hello,

I’m Dacker Thicke, thanks for visiting my blog. I am 90 years old and the oldest member of the famous Thicke family. I am a veteran of WWII and have lived a life full of adventure. I am now a published author of 4 books. I am posting a short story for your viewing pleasure. If you like what you read scroll further to see a description of each of my novels and a link to purchase them. Each book is unique and I’m sure there is a book to peak every reader’s interest. Don’t be shy give them a browse I’m sure you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

BORN LOSER
I had never won a damn thing in my entire life, yet I kept trying.
Whatever possessed me to pay twenty bucks for a chance on a brand
new Cadillac, I can’t tell you, unless it was the sign that said only five
thousand tickets were to be sold? That’s one chance in five thousand, a hell of a sight better than any of those lottery tickets. Can you believe that I, a born loser, won? I didn’t even have enough money for the gas to drive it away.
The news came just as I was leaving my room to keep a ten a.m.
interview for a janitorial job. Informed there was a full tank of gas, I
decided to pick up my win on the way to the interview. I was dressed up in the best suit and shoes I’d ever owned, a present to myself after
working ten weeks planting tree seedlings, the most back-breaking work known to man. After another eleven weeks without a job, I was wishing to hell I’d never bought the clothes.
I pulled into the big fruit cannery parking lot and looked around for a
parking space. A distinguished-looking gentleman called over and said “Take my spot. I’m going out.” I thanked him and waited while he pulled out. After parking, I walked up to the cannery office.
I found the receptionist and said I was there to apply for the position.
Yes, she interrupted, that was Mr. Cooper you just spoke to. He will be back shortly. He asked that the applicant be shown into his private
office.
Strange, I thought, the man must be filled with humility to be so
gracious to a janitorial applicant. The receptionist seated me in a soft leather chair and served me a coffee and a danish. I was starved. I hadn’t had enough money to buy breakfast.
Ten minutes later Mr. Cooper came in with his hand outstretched.
Cooper, he said.
Jackson, I replied.
I’m not going to ask you for a long list of your accomplishments, he said. Your car and clothes speak for themselves. I admire success. I’ll ask you one question, though: Can you handle the job?
Without hesitation I said, “Certainly.” thinking to myself that if I can’t
change a few light bulbs, unplug a sink or cut a little grass then I’d better give up.
“Fine,” he said, “the job is yours. You will be on your own. Your main
function is to see that the pineapple planting continues on schedule and we get a full progress report every week. Your secretary will have it all set up for you there.  She knows every step of the program. All we ask is a full crop at the end of the year. My receptionist will give you your advance, plane ticket and the keys to your bungalow and car in Hawaii.
You can park your car in our garage here to use whenever you take a
trip back.” With that he stood up and shook my hand, dismissing me.
Dazed, I returned to the foyer. The receptionist was expecting me and
handed me a briefcase, keys, a plane ticket and a cash advance of a
thousand dollars.
“The directions to the plantation are in the briefcase, Sir.” she said to
me. “They’ll be informed that you’ll be arriving to take charge, may I
have your full name and social insurance number for our files?”
“Thank you,” I mumbled and took out a pen to write out the
information she requested. “By the way,” I asked her, “what was the
final figure we agreed upon for the wage?”
“Seventy-five thousand a year in the usual increments and added
bonuses,” she replied.
“Thank you again,” I said, still stunned. I wasn’t about to point out their error.
Those people on the island better be on their toes when I get there, I
thought to myself. A man who’s personally planted two hundred
thousand fir seedlings will certainly know how to plant a few
pineapples, especially with a secretary to show me how.

Thank-you for reading. If you scroll further down the page you will see and read descriptions of my full length novels.

-Dacker Thicke

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